The Effect of Low Level Laser Therapy on Some Plasma Ions Concentration



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نادية حسين صاحب طاهر
25/02/2019 08:01:35


The Effect of Low Level Laser Therapy on Some Plasma Ions Concentration

Abstract:

Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has various applications in clinical pathology. It has
been found to be efficient in acceleration of wound healing, enhanced remodeling and bone
repair, regeneration of neural cells following injury, pain attenuation, endorphin release
stimulation and modulation of immune system. The possible intracellular sequence of events
after treatment with LLLT, include induction of oxidative phosphorylation with increased
enzymatic activity, increased expression of certain cytosolic enzymes and enhanced activity
of intracellular organelles. A broad range of eukaryotic proteins require posttranslational
modifications such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, or signal peptide cleavage to display
full functional activity. Eukaryotic cell-free expression systems provide the possibility to
synthesize eukaryotic proteins with posttranslational modifications and are especially useful
for expression and analysis of human proteins with native structure and function. The
stimulated mechanism involves protein- to-protein interaction, where two or more proteins
bind together to facilitate molecular processes, including modification of proteins by
members of small ubiquitin- related modifier proteins (SUMO) and also protein
phosphorylation and tyrosination.
The consequence of laser application in treatment, can be seen as influencing the
transmission of intracellular signals via an integrated and rapid modulation of ion channels,
achieved through both direct action on photo-acceptors (such as cytochrome c-oxidase) and
through indirect modulation via enzymes, including tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tyrosine
kinases and tyrosine kinase receptors. This exogenous action then facilitates an existing
photonic biomodulation mechanism with the body, and initiates ion channel modulation
both in the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS).
Evidence indicates that the ion channel modulation functions predominately through
the potassium channels, including two pore leak channels (K2P), which act as signal
integrators from the periphery to the cortex.


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